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PA, External Relations – Part time 50% – The Hague

The European Climate Foundation is seeking an assistant for its external relations activities reporting to the Director, External Relations. The candidate will have strong executive support experience, a good grasp of office computer functions including Word, Excel and Power Point and strong interpersonal skills.

About the European Climate Foundation

The European Climate Foundation (ECF) was established in 2008 as a collaboration of foundations, a “Foundation of Foundations”. Our founders — which include the Oak Foundation, the McCall MacBain Foundation, the Children’s Investment Fund Foundation (CIFF) and the Hewlett Foundation, amongst others — recognised that climate change is complex and that the challenges of climate change require broad coalitions and frameworks. Thus, they pooled resources and created a single-focus foundation to deliver higher impact by consolidating philanthropic expenditure on climate change issues.

This critical mass of resources enables strategies and campaigns that bring together stakeholders from civil society, academia, business and politics – all of which are necessary to get to scalable decarbonisation solutions. The ECF aims for Europe to become a reference point for the world in the transition to a low-carbon economy, which is essential to avoid unmanageable risks from climate change. Our goal is to support the transition of nearly all of Europe’s energy supply from carbon-intensive fuels to renewable energy sources by the year 2050 with the help of innovative energy and climate policies at the global, regional and European Union Member State levels.

PA for the Director, External Relations

The ideal candidate will have a structured personality, strong interpersonal skills, be able to work independently as well as connect within a team. They must be fluent in spoken and written English, and be fluent in at least two other European languages. The minimum requirement is at least three years’ experience as a senior level Personal Assistant, as is an understanding of protocol and management of high level personalities.

Primary Duties and Responsibilities

1.     Personal Assistant to the Director, External Relations

  • Primary responsibilities include meeting and travel scheduling
  • Maintaining the files and contacts lists in the database
  • Being the diplomatic face of ECF in terms of interactions with the offices of our key partners and contacts.

2.     Events & ER Team Support

  • Assist Events & ER Managers with mailings of events invitations, newsletters, funder updates, annual reports etc.
  • Assist with logistics as necessary for prospect dinners, seminars or similar ad hoc events throughout the year

3.     Coordination with Board offices

  • Be the primary contact responsible for setting dates for Board meetings, Board Committee meetings and calls (which are related to the Board dates)
  • Liaise with Board PAs and with ECF colleagues internally to coordinate meeting dates
  • Liaise with the Director, ER or COO to ensure all mailings to the Board are implemented in a timely manner
  • Liaise with PAs to schedule individual meetings for Board members outside of the regular Board dates

Key competencies and characteristics

  • Personal Assistant Degree (i.e. Schoevers), or equivalent by experience
  • At least 3 years of work experience as a senior level Personal Assistant
  • Structured personality
  • Strong interpersonal skills
  • Work independently as well as connect within a team
  • Ability to prioritize workload
  • Attention to detail and precision, solid work ethics concerning meeting deadlines and reliability.
  • Must be fluent in spoken and written English, and be fluent in at least two other European languages.
  • Located in The Hague

Preferred starting date: as soon as possible.

Contract: temporary one year, with possibility to extend

Compensation: The European Climate Foundation offers a salary that is commensurate with education and experience.

TO APPLY

Deadline for submission of your application is Friday 15 August 2014.

Candidates must be in possession of valid work permit for The Netherlands, if applicable.

If you are interested in this position, please send your CV and cover letter in English by email to employment@europeanclimate.org. In the Subject line of the email, please put ´Recruitment – PA, External Relations´.

For more information on the ECF, please visit: www.europeanclimate.org

 

Green Growth: Lessons from Country Experiences

Green Growth: Lessons from Country Experiences

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Featuring 60 case studies from developing and developed countries, and reviewing governments’ and others’ experiences, the ‘Green Growth in Practice: Lessons from Country Experiences’ report is the first comprehensive global assessment of lessons and good practices in green growth planning.

Supported by Climate & Development Knowledge Network, the European Climate Foundation and the Global Green Growth Institute and focusing on nine key areas of green growth, this new report provides a wealth of information on effective approaches for harnessing the power of resource efficiency and climate compatible development for advancing economic, social and environmental goals.

For more information on the Green Growth Best Practice project, please visit http://ggbp.org

Climate Change: Implications for Extractive and Primary Industries

Climate Change: Implications for Extractive and Primary Industries

A new briefing published by BSR, the Cambridge Institute for Sustainability Leadership (CISL) and the Cambridge Judge Business School (CJBS) distils the key findings from the recently released Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Fifth Assessment Report for extractive and primary industries.

The briefing concludes that:

Industry_IG

  • Physical impacts of climate change on primary industries are likely to include damage to infrastructure and industrial capital assets, and could reduce availability of renewable natural resources including water.
  • Total greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from industry almost doubled between 1970 and 2010.
  • Most sector scenarios project that global demand for industrial products will increase by 45–60% by 2050 relative to 2010 production levels. Rising demand for products used to reduce GHG emissions and to adapt to climate impacts could, perversely, create pressures to increase industrial emissions.
  • An absolute reduction in GHG emissions by primary industry will require implementation of a broad range of mitigation strategies. Opportunities for mitigation include both production-related strategies, geared towards improving industrial process efficiencies, and demand-related strategies focused on reducing the overall use of product material.

Extractive Industries CoverThe industries summary is one of a series of thirteen, based upon The Fifth Assessment Report (AR5) of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC).

AR5 represents the most comprehensive overview of climate science to date and is the fact base that will utilised by governments and businesses to formulate climate policy in the coming years. The set of summaries cover the broad implications of climate change, how the IPCCC works and give an overview of the physical science, as well as adaptation and mitigation options. The summaries, in addition to extractive and primary industries, cover the tourism sector, the transport sector, the agriculture industry, defence, the energy sector, fisheries and aquaculture, the building sector, investors and financial institutions, cities and employment.

This publication has been developed and released by BSR, CISL, CJBS and ECF.

For more information and to download the report, please visit the CISL webpage.

Climate Change: Implications for Investors and Financial Institutions

Climate Change: Implications for Investors and Financial Institutions

A new briefing published by the Institutional Investors Group on Climate Change (IIGCC), the United Nations Environment Programme Finance Initiative (UNEP FI), the Cambridge Institute for Sustainability Leadership (CISL) and the Cambridge Judge Business School (CJBS) distils the key findings from the recently released Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Fifth Assessment Report for investors and financial institutions.

The briefing concludes that:

Investors_IG

  • Climate change will affect all sectors of the economy, and is relevant to investors and financial institutions. However, not all macroeconomic changes and microeconomic conditions will apply equally to all investments.
    • There are risks and opportunities associated with policy measures directed at reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. To meet the internationally agreed target of keeping the global average temperature rise since pre-industrial times below 2°C, patterns of investment will need to change considerably.
  • Physical impacts of climate change will affect assets and investments. Climate change and extreme weather events will affect agriculture and food supply, infrastructure, precipitation and the water supply in ways that are only partially understood.
  • Decisions made by private sector investors and financial institutions will have a major influence on how society responds to climate change.
  • There will be significant demand for capital, with governments looking to the private sector to provide much of it. To keep the global temperature increase below 2°C, additional investment required in the energy supply sector alone is estimated to be between USD 190 and 900 billion per year through to 20501, accompanied by a significant shift away from fossil fuels towards low-carbon sources such as renewables and nuclear.

Investors_CoverThe investors summary is one of a series of thirteen, based upon The Fifth Assessment Report (AR5) of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC).

AR5 represents the most comprehensive overview of climate science to date and is the fact base that will utilised by governments and businesses to formulate climate policy in the coming years. The set of summaries cover the broad implications of climate change, how the IPCCC works and give an overview of the physical science, as well as adaptation and mitigation options. The summaries, in addition to investors and financial institutions, cover the tourism sector, the transport sector, the agriculture industry, defence, the energy sector, fisheries and aquaculture, the building sector, primary industries, cities and employment.

This publication has been developed and released by IIGCC, UNEP FI, CISL, CJBS and ECF.

For more information and to download the report, please visit the CISL webpage.

Communications internship at the ECF’s Energy Strategy Center (Brussels)

The European Climate Foundation

The European Climate Foundation (ECF) was established in 2008 as a major philanthropic initiative to promote climate and energy policies that greatly reduce Europe’s greenhouse gas emissions and to help Europe play a stronger international leadership role in mitigating climate change. The ECF is part of the international ClimateWorks Network (CWN) that shares goals, strategies and resources to address the global challenge of climate change mitigation as part of a global network of aligned organisations. It is funded by major multi-year commitments from donors in Europe and the United States. The ECF team is a highly dynamic group of individuals, combining ambition and passion with a rigorous, results-oriented and analytic approach to work. The ECF’s culture is one of intensity, enthusiasm, and mutual support.

The Energy Strategy Center

The Energy Strategy Center (ESC) is the communications unit of the European Climate Foundation. Its role is to act as a center of expertise for communication on climate change. Its objective is to help create political, media and public endorsement for strong action to address climate change at an international, national and sector level. It applies its communications expertise and resources to ensure that climate change issues are objectively and accurately reported and debated in the public space. The ESC delivers communications and advocacy services to ECF grantees and partners and builds this capacity in the climate community.

The Position – Communications Internship

The ESC is currently accepting applications for an enthusiastic individual to gain professional experience in climate change communications as a “Communications Intern”. This is an exciting opportunity for a graduate/young professional with a sincere interest in climate and energy issues and the way they are interpreted and reported in the media. As part of the Media team, the candidate will work in the ECF’s Brussels Office in support of all programmes and projects of the ECF.

Intern Responsibilities

Assignments can vary depending on the strategic needs of the organisation, but the intern’s responsibilities will include some of the following tasks:

  • Working with the ESC’s Media team to support the communications and media needs of the ECF and its grantees.
  • Contributing to the development and delivery of effective outreach strategies to drive progressive EU policy-making in the climate and energy field.
  • Supporting workstreams aimed at strengthening the outcome of the international negotiations within the UNFCCC
  • Making full use of IT and new media tools to disseminate the messaging of the ECF, its projects and those of its grantees further.
  • Taking ownership of the ESC’s internal communications database, making sure its contacts are up-to-date and developing it further to ensure it delivers on the communications needs of the ECF’s programmes and projects.
  • Supporting a large communications campaign around a major global scientific report on climate change.
  • Monitoring of the news agenda and regular reporting on coverage.
  • Maintaining a dynamic calendar of ECF activity and external events to enhance communications planning.
  • Planning, promotion and coordination of conferences and events.
  • Other ad hoc research work and administrative tasks.

Experience required

The ideal candidate will have the following practical qualifications:

  • Demonstrated interest in the mission and values of the ECF and ESC.
  • Fast-learning self-starter comfortable in a fast-paced international environment
  • Professional experience and/or academic background in the fields of communications, IT, energy, environmental issues, EU/international affairs or public policy.
  • Media-savvy with proven experience in writing/editing.
  • Excellent IT skills and up to speed with the latest online communication tools.
  • Displays enthusiasm to help reframe the public and media debate around the issue of climate change.
  • Strong project management skills
  • Appreciates the vital role of administrative tasks.
  • Ability to work both in a team and independently.
  • Superior English written and verbal communication skills are essential; knowledge of other EU languages welcome.

What we offer

With this opportunity, we offer:

  • An exciting international working environment
  • Valuable first-hand professional experience and development
  • On the job mentoring to help you develop your skills
  • An introduction to the ECF’s vast network of connections in the field
  • A sense of satisfaction from contributing to the global climate debate
  • Compensation in line with internship opportunities at EU institutions
  • Temporary contract of 6 months

How to apply

Please send a CV, a short cover letter in English, explaining why you think you would be suited to the role, as well as your response to the below exercise by Thursday, 26 June 2014 to: employment@europeanclimate.org. Please use the following format in the subject line: ESCCommsInternship_Firstname_Surname. Only short-listed candidates will be contacted. Candidates must be in possession of valid work permit for Belgium and available to start immediately.

Exercise: Sum up this report in 3 tweets.

Climate Change: Implications for the Energy Sector

Climate Change: Implications for the Energy Sector

A new briefing published by the World Energy Council (WEC), the Cambridge Institute for Sustainability Leadership (CISL) and the Cambridge Judge Business School (CJBS) distils the key findings from the recently released Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Fifth Assessment Report for the energy sector.

The briefing concludes that:

Energy Use_IG

  • Energy demand is increasing globally, causing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from the energy sector also to increase. The trend is set to continue, driven primarily by economic growth and the rising population.
  • Climate change presents increasing challenges for energy production and transmission. A progressive temperature increase, an increasing number and severity of extreme weather events and changing precipitation patterns will affect energy production and delivery. The supply of fossil fuels, and thermal and hydropower generation and transmission, will also be affected. However, adaptation options exist.
  • Significant cuts in GHG emissions from energy can be achieved through a variety of measures.
  • Incentivising investment in low-carbon technologies will be a key challenge for governments and regulators to achieve carbon reduction targets. Reducing GHG emissions also brings important co- benefits such as improved health and employment, but supply-side mitigation measures also carry risks.

Energy Use_CoverThe Energy summary is one of a series of thirteen, based upon The Fifth Assessment Report (AR5) of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC).

AR5 represents the most comprehensive overview of climate science to date and is the fact base that will utilised by governments and businesses to formulate climate policy in the coming years. The set of summaries cover the broad implications of climate change, how the IPCCC works and give an overview of the physical science, as well as adaptation and mitigation options. The summaries, in addition to energy, cover the tourism sector, investors and financial institutions, the transport sector, the agriculture industry, defence, fisheries and aquaculture, the building sector, primary industries, cities and employment.

This publication has been developed and released by WEC, CISL, CJBS and ECF.

For more information and to download the report, please visit the CISL webpage.

ECF is “Key Player”

ECF is “Key Player”

CSI new page

May 2014 – A report by the Centre for Social Investment analyses how six foundation and non-profit organisations leverage social impact through cooperation.

The analysts find that ECF, as biggest philanthropic actor in the field of climate change in Europe, has a unique approach and strategy. “[ECF] fosters collaboration and coalition building among its grantees and partners to build a political voice for a certain topic and/or to facilitate synthesis and exchange of political intelligence and technical knowledge. The precondition to identify those gaps that can create leverage in climate change-related politics is a detailed, systemic understanding of the field as well as continuous learning about the own project portfolio.” The report gives a good overview of ECF’s history, its strategy-building process and its current programmes – with a special focus on the Energy Efficiency programme.

Read the full report on the website of the CSI, chapter 2 focuses on ECF.

Climate Change: Implications for Tourism

Climate Change: Implications for Tourism

A new briefing published by the Cambridge Institute for Sustainability Leadership (CISL) and the Cambridge Judge Business School (CJBS) distils the key findings from the recently released Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Fifth Assessment Report for the tourism sector.

The briefing concludes that:

Tourism_IG

  • The sector is exposed to numerous direct and indirect impacts from climate change. Sea-level rise and more acidic oceans will threaten coastal tourism infrastructure and natural attractions. Rising temperatures will shorten winter sport seasons and threaten the viability of some ski resorts. Climate change will lead to changes in biodiversity, affecting eco-tourism.
  • Adaptation options exist, but many are likely to add costs and offer only short-term relief. Locations at risk can invest in more resilient infrastructure. However, under scenarios that see high emissions, and higher temperatures, questions exist as to whether adaptation is possible at all.
  • The contribution of tourism to greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions is rising, and are projected to grow 130% between 2005 and 2035.
  • There is considerable uncertainty about how tourists will respond to the effects of climate change. Academic research provides much detail on likely impacts, and on possible changes in tourism demand. These changes are likely to create opportunities at both the destination and business level.

Tourism_CoverThe Tourism summary is one of a series of thirteen, based upon The Fifth Assessment Report (AR5) of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC).

AR5 represents the most comprehensive overview of climate science to date and is the fact base that will utilised by governments and businesses to formulate climate policy in the coming years. The set of summaries cover the broad implications of climate change, how the IPCCC works and give an overview of the physical science, as well as adaptation and mitigation options. The summaries, in addition to tourism, cover the energy sector, investors and financial institutions, the transport sector, the agriculture industry, defence, fisheries and aquaculture, the building sector, primary industries, cities and employment.

This publication has been developed and released by CISL, CJBS and ECF.

For more information and to download the report, please visit the CISL webpage.

Direct download:
AR5 Tourism Briefing
AR5 Tourism Infographic

Climate Change: Implications for Buildings

Climate Change: Implications for Buildings

A new briefing published by the Buildings Performance Institute Europe (BPIE), the Global Buildings Performance Network (GBPN), the World Business Council for Sustainable Development (WBCSD), the Cambridge Institute for Sustainability Leadership (CISL) and the Cambridge Judge Business School (CJBS) distils the key findings from the recently released Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Fifth Assessment Report for the building sector.

The briefing concludes that:

Buildings_infographic
  • In 2010, the world’s buildings accounted for 32% of global final energy use and 19% of all greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Under business-as-usual projections, use of energy in buildings globally could double or even triple by 2050.
  • Widespread implementation of best practices and technologies could see energy use in buildings stabilise or even fall by 2050. Many mitigation options promise multiple co-benefits.
  • Know-how exists on retrofitting and how to build very low- and zero-energy buildings, often at little marginal investment cost; and there is a broad portfolio of effective policy instruments available to remove barriers to uptake.
  • Buildings face major risks of damage from the projected impacts of climate change, having already experienced a big increase in extreme weather damage in recent decades.
Buildings_Cover

The Buildings summary is one of a series of thirteen, based upon The Fifth Assessment Report (AR5) of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC).

AR5 represents the most comprehensive overview of climate science to date and is the fact base that will utilised by governments and businesses

to formulate climate policy in the coming years. The set of summaries cover the broad implications of climate change, how the IPCCC works and give an overview of the physical science, as well as adaptation and mitigation options. The summaries, in addition to buildings, cover the energy sector, investors and financial institutions, the transport sector, the tourism industry, defence, fisheries and aquaculture, the agriculture sector, primary industries, cities and employment.

This publication has been developed and released by BPIE, GBPN, WBCSD, CISL, CJBS and ECF.

For more information and to download the report, please visit the CISL webpage.

Climate Change: Implications for Agriculture

Climate Change: Implications for Agriculture

A new briefing published by Business for Social Responsibility (BSR), the Cambridge Institute for Sustainability Leadership (CISL) and the Cambridge Judge Business School (CJBS) distils the key findings from the recently released Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Fifth Assessment Report for the agricultural sector.

The briefing concludes that:

Agriculture_IG

  • Climate-related impacts are already reducing crop yields in some parts of the world, a trend that is projected to continue as temperatures rise further.
  • Farmers can adapt to some changes, but there is a limit to what can be managed. The agricultural industry’s own interests are best served by ambitious approaches to adaptation and to cutting emissions.
  • Greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from agriculture comprised about 10–12% of man-made GHG emissions in 2010.
  • Opportunities for mitigation include reducing emissions from land use change, land management and livestock management.
  • The potential for reducing GHG emissions through changes in consumption could be substantially higher than technical mitigation options.

Agriculture_CoverThe Agriculture summary is one of a series of thirteen, based upon The Fifth Assessment Report (AR5) of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC).

AR5 represents the most comprehensive overview of climate science to date and is the fact base that will utilised by governments and businesses to formulate climate policy in the coming years. The set of summaries cover the broad implications of climate change, how the IPCCC works and give an overview of the physical science, as well as adaptation and mitigation options. The summaries, in addition to agriculture, cover the energy sector, investors and financial institutions, the transport sector, the tourism industry, defence, fisheries and aquaculture, the building sector, primary industries, cities and employment.

This publication has been developed and released by BSR, CISL, CJBS and ECF.

For more information and to download the report, please visit the CISL webpage.