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Europe’s low-carbon transition: understanding the chemicals sector

Europe’s low-carbon transition: understanding the chemicals sector

Is there a way for Europe to increase its competitiveness, while at the same time reducing its greenhouse gas emissions?  This is the key question that the European Climate Foundation asks in a study looking at the relationship between emissions reductions and competitiveness, using the European chemicals industry as a case study.

The ECF authored the report with analytical support from McKinsey & Company and in consultation with a group of industry representatives and academics. It highlights the need for a broader notion of competitiveness to enable Europe to profit from the challenges of the transition. As a major share of emissions reduction opportunities identified in the study lie in cross-company and cross-sector integration, the question is raised as to how industry and policy makers can interact effectively to unlock these more complex opportunities.

The report can be downloaded here.

The annexes can be downloaded here.

The launch presentation can be downloaded here.

Europe’s Failure to Quit Coal

Europe’s Failure to Quit Coal

Sandbag’s report reveals that high emission levels from coal in the power sector could be here to stay unless policies change. Coal emissions in the power sector have risen 6% since 2010, even as power demand falls and renewables massively grow. Coal for power now represents 18% of total EU CO2 emissions, equivalent to all road transport. Growth in renewables has almost entirely displaced gas generation. If coal generation had been displaced, EU power emissions could have fallen by 18% instead of 7%, since 2010. The report explores the question of how long high coal use in the EU could continue and concludes that unless there are changes in the EU’s energy and climate policies it could remain stubbornly high into the next decade.

Download the report here.

Europe’s Dirty 30

Europe’s Dirty 30

CO2 emissions from Europe’s coal power plants are undermining climate efforts, reveals the “Europe’s Dirty 30″ report, released by CAN Europe, WWF, European Environmental Bureau, Health and Environment Alliance (HEAL) and Climate Alliance Germany. The report exposes the top 30 CO2-emitting power plants in the EU in 2013, with Poland, Germany and the UK ranking first.

Despite the rapid increase of renewables and the overall decrease of total EU greenhouse gas emissions, CO2 emissions from coal power stations have recently risen. Many of the EU’s coal-fired plants are now running at or near full capacity, due to a combination of economic factors, including the relatively low price of coal compared to gas and the low CO2 price caused by weak EU climate policy.

These developments put the EU in grave danger of not phasing out emissions from coal quickly enough, hence undermining the EU’s climate ambitions. The report sets out policies needed to tackle the pollution and states that the rapid phase-out of CO2 emissions from coal has to become a priority.

The report is available here.

Climate Change: Implications for Transport

Climate Change: Implications for Transport

A new briefing published by BSR, the Cambridge Institute for Sustainability Leadership (CISL) and the Cambridge Judge Business School (CJBS) distils the key findings from the recently released Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Fifth Assessment Report for the transport sector.

Key findings of the briefing include:

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    • Physical impacts of climate change on primary industries are likely to include damage to infrastructure and industrial capital assets, and could reduce availability of renewable natural resources including water.
    • Total greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from industry almost doubled between 1970 and 2010.
    • Most sector scenarios project that global demand for industrial products will increase by 45–60% by 2050 relative to 2010 production levels. Rising demand for products used to reduce GHG emissions and to adapt to climate impacts could, perversely, create pressures to increase industrial emissions.
    • An absolute reduction in GHG emissions by primary industry will require implementation of a broad range of mitigation strategies. Opportunities for mitigation include both production-related strategies, geared towards improving industrial process efficiencies, and demand-related strategies focused on reducing the overall use of product material.

Transport IG WEBThe industries summary is one of a series of thirteen, based upon The Fifth Assessment Report (AR5) of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC).

AR5 represents the most comprehensive overview of climate science to date and is the fact base that will utilised by governments and businesses to formulate climate policy in the coming years. The set of summaries cover the broad implications of climate change, how the IPCCC works and give an overview of the physical science, as well as adaptation and mitigation options. The summaries, in addition to the transport sector, cover the tourism sector, the transport sector, the agriculture industry, defence, the energy sector, extractive and primary industries, fisheries and aquaculture, the building sector, investors and financial institutions, cities and employment.

This publication has been developed and released by BSR, CISL, CJBS and ECF.

For more information and to download the report, please visit the CISL webpage.

Dirty Deals – Trade Talks Undermine EU Climate Policies

Dirty Deals – Trade Talks Undermine EU Climate Policies

Screen Shot 2014 07 24 at 11.04.32Since its inception in 2009, the Fuel Quality Directive (FQD), a European Union regulation aimed at reducing the climate impact of transport fuels, has been attacked by powerful lobby interests that do not want the EU to take action to curtail the use of particularly greenhouse gas intensive fossil fuels. While the FQD aims to reduce the climate impact of fossil fuels by addressing all sources of high carbon oil (for example oil shale, coal-to-liquid or tar sands), the oil industry has waged an extensive lobby campaign to portray the FQD as unfairly discriminating against one specific oil source: tar sands.

Recently the pressure on the EU to weaken the Fuel Quality Directive has increased notably, with oil industry groups taking the lead on lobbying efforts. And oil companies and refiners have found a new lobby vehicle to attack the FQD: the ongoing negotiations for the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP). The report argues that a truly ambitious transatlantic partnership would promote the transition towards clean renewable energy sources and the phasing-out of dangerous and carbon-intensive fossil fuels. However, it appears that for the TTIP the opposite holds true and it is more likely to undermine current climate-friendly initiatives and deter necessary actions to address the climate crisis.

Download the report here.

PA, External Relations – Part time 50% – The Hague

The European Climate Foundation is seeking an assistant for its external relations activities reporting to the Director, External Relations. The candidate will have strong executive support experience, a good grasp of office computer functions including Word, Excel and Power Point and strong interpersonal skills.

About the European Climate Foundation

The European Climate Foundation (ECF) was established in 2008 as a collaboration of foundations, a “Foundation of Foundations”. Our founders — which include the Oak Foundation, the McCall MacBain Foundation, the Children’s Investment Fund Foundation (CIFF) and the Hewlett Foundation, amongst others — recognised that climate change is complex and that the challenges of climate change require broad coalitions and frameworks. Thus, they pooled resources and created a single-focus foundation to deliver higher impact by consolidating philanthropic expenditure on climate change issues.

This critical mass of resources enables strategies and campaigns that bring together stakeholders from civil society, academia, business and politics – all of which are necessary to get to scalable decarbonisation solutions. The ECF aims for Europe to become a reference point for the world in the transition to a low-carbon economy, which is essential to avoid unmanageable risks from climate change. Our goal is to support the transition of nearly all of Europe’s energy supply from carbon-intensive fuels to renewable energy sources by the year 2050 with the help of innovative energy and climate policies at the global, regional and European Union Member State levels.

PA for the Director, External Relations

The ideal candidate will have a structured personality, strong interpersonal skills, be able to work independently as well as connect within a team. They must be fluent in spoken and written English, and be fluent in at least two other European languages. The minimum requirement is at least three years’ experience as a senior level Personal Assistant, as is an understanding of protocol and management of high level personalities.

Primary Duties and Responsibilities

1.     Personal Assistant to the Director, External Relations

  • Primary responsibilities include meeting and travel scheduling
  • Maintaining the files and contacts lists in the database
  • Being the diplomatic face of ECF in terms of interactions with the offices of our key partners and contacts.

2.     Events & ER Team Support

  • Assist Events & ER Managers with mailings of events invitations, newsletters, funder updates, annual reports etc.
  • Assist with logistics as necessary for prospect dinners, seminars or similar ad hoc events throughout the year

3.     Coordination with Board offices

  • Be the primary contact responsible for setting dates for Board meetings, Board Committee meetings and calls (which are related to the Board dates)
  • Liaise with Board PAs and with ECF colleagues internally to coordinate meeting dates
  • Liaise with the Director, ER or COO to ensure all mailings to the Board are implemented in a timely manner
  • Liaise with PAs to schedule individual meetings for Board members outside of the regular Board dates

Key competencies and characteristics

  • Personal Assistant Degree (i.e. Schoevers), or equivalent by experience
  • At least 3 years of work experience as a senior level Personal Assistant
  • Structured personality
  • Strong interpersonal skills
  • Work independently as well as connect within a team
  • Ability to prioritize workload
  • Attention to detail and precision, solid work ethics concerning meeting deadlines and reliability.
  • Must be fluent in spoken and written English, and be fluent in at least two other European languages.
  • Located in The Hague

Preferred starting date: as soon as possible.

Contract: temporary one year, with possibility to extend

Compensation: The European Climate Foundation offers a salary that is commensurate with education and experience.

TO APPLY

Deadline for submission of your application is Friday 15 August 2014.

Candidates must be in possession of valid work permit for The Netherlands, if applicable.

If you are interested in this position, please send your CV and cover letter in English by email to employment@europeanclimate.org. In the Subject line of the email, please put ´Recruitment – PA, External Relations´.

For more information on the ECF, please visit: www.europeanclimate.org

 

Green Growth: Lessons from Country Experiences

Green Growth: Lessons from Country Experiences

Screen Shot 2014-07-01 at 11.19.06

 

Featuring 60 case studies from developing and developed countries, and reviewing governments’ and others’ experiences, the ‘Green Growth in Practice: Lessons from Country Experiences’ report is the first comprehensive global assessment of lessons and good practices in green growth planning.

Supported by Climate & Development Knowledge Network, the European Climate Foundation and the Global Green Growth Institute and focusing on nine key areas of green growth, this new report provides a wealth of information on effective approaches for harnessing the power of resource efficiency and climate compatible development for advancing economic, social and environmental goals.

For more information on the Green Growth Best Practice project, please visit http://ggbp.org

Climate Change: Implications for Extractive and Primary Industries

Climate Change: Implications for Extractive and Primary Industries

A new briefing published by BSR, the Cambridge Institute for Sustainability Leadership (CISL) and the Cambridge Judge Business School (CJBS) distils the key findings from the recently released Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Fifth Assessment Report for extractive and primary industries.

The briefing concludes that:

Industry_IG

  • Physical impacts of climate change on primary industries are likely to include damage to infrastructure and industrial capital assets, and could reduce availability of renewable natural resources including water.
  • Total greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from industry almost doubled between 1970 and 2010.
  • Most sector scenarios project that global demand for industrial products will increase by 45–60% by 2050 relative to 2010 production levels. Rising demand for products used to reduce GHG emissions and to adapt to climate impacts could, perversely, create pressures to increase industrial emissions.
  • An absolute reduction in GHG emissions by primary industry will require implementation of a broad range of mitigation strategies. Opportunities for mitigation include both production-related strategies, geared towards improving industrial process efficiencies, and demand-related strategies focused on reducing the overall use of product material.

Extractive Industries CoverThe industries summary is one of a series of thirteen, based upon The Fifth Assessment Report (AR5) of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC).

AR5 represents the most comprehensive overview of climate science to date and is the fact base that will utilised by governments and businesses to formulate climate policy in the coming years. The set of summaries cover the broad implications of climate change, how the IPCCC works and give an overview of the physical science, as well as adaptation and mitigation options. The summaries, in addition to extractive and primary industries, cover the tourism sector, the transport sector, the agriculture industry, defence, the energy sector, fisheries and aquaculture, the building sector, investors and financial institutions, cities and employment.

This publication has been developed and released by BSR, CISL, CJBS and ECF.

For more information and to download the report, please visit the CISL webpage.

Climate Change: Implications for Investors and Financial Institutions

Climate Change: Implications for Investors and Financial Institutions

A new briefing published by the Institutional Investors Group on Climate Change (IIGCC), the United Nations Environment Programme Finance Initiative (UNEP FI), the Cambridge Institute for Sustainability Leadership (CISL) and the Cambridge Judge Business School (CJBS) distils the key findings from the recently released Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Fifth Assessment Report for investors and financial institutions.

The briefing concludes that:

Investors_IG

  • Climate change will affect all sectors of the economy, and is relevant to investors and financial institutions. However, not all macroeconomic changes and microeconomic conditions will apply equally to all investments.
    • There are risks and opportunities associated with policy measures directed at reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. To meet the internationally agreed target of keeping the global average temperature rise since pre-industrial times below 2°C, patterns of investment will need to change considerably.
  • Physical impacts of climate change will affect assets and investments. Climate change and extreme weather events will affect agriculture and food supply, infrastructure, precipitation and the water supply in ways that are only partially understood.
  • Decisions made by private sector investors and financial institutions will have a major influence on how society responds to climate change.
  • There will be significant demand for capital, with governments looking to the private sector to provide much of it. To keep the global temperature increase below 2°C, additional investment required in the energy supply sector alone is estimated to be between USD 190 and 900 billion per year through to 20501, accompanied by a significant shift away from fossil fuels towards low-carbon sources such as renewables and nuclear.

Investors_CoverThe investors summary is one of a series of thirteen, based upon The Fifth Assessment Report (AR5) of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC).

AR5 represents the most comprehensive overview of climate science to date and is the fact base that will utilised by governments and businesses to formulate climate policy in the coming years. The set of summaries cover the broad implications of climate change, how the IPCCC works and give an overview of the physical science, as well as adaptation and mitigation options. The summaries, in addition to investors and financial institutions, cover the tourism sector, the transport sector, the agriculture industry, defence, the energy sector, fisheries and aquaculture, the building sector, primary industries, cities and employment.

This publication has been developed and released by IIGCC, UNEP FI, CISL, CJBS and ECF.

For more information and to download the report, please visit the CISL webpage.

Climate Change: Implications for the Energy Sector

Climate Change: Implications for the Energy Sector

A new briefing published by the World Energy Council (WEC), the Cambridge Institute for Sustainability Leadership (CISL) and the Cambridge Judge Business School (CJBS) distils the key findings from the recently released Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Fifth Assessment Report for the energy sector.

The briefing concludes that:

Energy Use_IG

  • Energy demand is increasing globally, causing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from the energy sector also to increase. The trend is set to continue, driven primarily by economic growth and the rising population.
  • Climate change presents increasing challenges for energy production and transmission. A progressive temperature increase, an increasing number and severity of extreme weather events and changing precipitation patterns will affect energy production and delivery. The supply of fossil fuels, and thermal and hydropower generation and transmission, will also be affected. However, adaptation options exist.
  • Significant cuts in GHG emissions from energy can be achieved through a variety of measures.
  • Incentivising investment in low-carbon technologies will be a key challenge for governments and regulators to achieve carbon reduction targets. Reducing GHG emissions also brings important co- benefits such as improved health and employment, but supply-side mitigation measures also carry risks.

Energy Use_CoverThe Energy summary is one of a series of thirteen, based upon The Fifth Assessment Report (AR5) of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC).

AR5 represents the most comprehensive overview of climate science to date and is the fact base that will utilised by governments and businesses to formulate climate policy in the coming years. The set of summaries cover the broad implications of climate change, how the IPCCC works and give an overview of the physical science, as well as adaptation and mitigation options. The summaries, in addition to energy, cover the tourism sector, investors and financial institutions, the transport sector, the agriculture industry, defence, fisheries and aquaculture, the building sector, primary industries, cities and employment.

This publication has been developed and released by WEC, CISL, CJBS and ECF.

For more information and to download the report, please visit the CISL webpage.