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New Climate Economy Report

New Climate Economy Report

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The Global Commission on the Economy and Climate has released “Better Growth, Better Climate: The New Climate Economy Report“ in NYC, Beijing, Oslo and Addis Abeba. Chaired by former President of Mexico Felipe Calderón the Global Commission finds that governments and businesses can both improve economic growth and reduce their carbon emissions.

On this occasion, the European Climate Foundation hosted a press briefing with major German media at its own premises in Berlin. Caio Koch-Weser, Executive Chairman of the European Climate Foundation, Vice Chairman of Deutsche Bank and a member of the 24-member Global Commission presented the key messages of the report. ECF-CEO Johannes Meier elaborated on the opportunities to strengthen the competitiveness of European industry in the future.

Globally, 90 trillion U.S. dollars will be invested in new infrastructure projects in the 15 years to come. In Europe, investments will amount a total of 16 trillion dollars. ”With smart infrastructure investments, Europe has the opportunity to advance ambitious climate targets and stimulate economic growth”, Caio Koch-Weser said. According to the report, ambitious climate policy has the potential to significantly strengthen economic growth within the next 5 to 15 years. ”The alleged conflict between economic growth, energy security and climate change turns out to be a myth as all three objectives can be realised. Providing the basis for investments and innovations a reliable political framework is key for sustainable growth and climate protection”, Koch-Weser highlighted.

Launch of the New Climate Economy Report

Launch of the New Climate Economy Report

ECF hosts press briefing with Chairman Caio Koch-Weser and CEO Johannes Meier

The Global Commission on the Economy and Climate has released “Better Growth, Better Climate: The New Climate Economy Report“ in NYC, Beijing, Oslo and Addis Abeba. Chaired by former President of Mexico Felipe Calderón the Global Commission finds that governments and businesses can both improve economic growth and reduce their carbon emissions.

On this occasion, the European Climate Foundation hosted a press briefing with major German media at its own premises in Berlin. Caio Koch-Weser, Executive Chairman of the European Climate Foundation, Vice Chairman of Deutsche Bank and a member of the 24-member Global Commission presented the key messages of the report. ECF-CEO Johannes Meier elaborated on the opportunities to strengthen the competitiveness of European industry in the future.

Globally, 90 trillion U.S. dollars will be invested in new infrastructure projects in the 15 years to come. In Europe, investments will amount a total of 16 trillion dollars. ”With smart infrastructure investments, Europe has the opportunity to advance ambitious climate targets and stimulate economic growth”, Caio Koch-Weser said. According to the report, ambitious climate policy has the potential to significantly strengthen economic growth within the next 5 to 15 years. ”The alleged conflict between economic growth, energy security and climate change turns out to be a myth as all three objectives can be realised. Providing the basis for investments and innovations a reliable political framework is key for sustainable growth and climate protection”, Koch-Weser highlighted.

  • Download the press release here.
  • Download the synthesis report here.

For more information, visit newclimateeconomy.report

Administrative HR Assistant (Part time 60%) – Brussels

The European Climate Foundation (ECF) was established in 2008 as a major philanthropic initiative to promote climate and energy policies that greatly reduce Europe’s greenhouse gas emissions and to help Europe play a stronger international leadership role to mitigate climate change. The ECF is funded by major multi-year commitments from donors in Europe and the United States. The ECF is part of the international ClimateWorks Network that shares goals, strategies and resources to address the global challenge of climate change mitigation with a global network of aligned organizations.

The ECF team is a highly dynamic group of individuals, combining ambition and passion with a rigorous, results-oriented and analytic approach to work. The ECF’s culture is one of intensity, enthusiasm and mutual support.

The Position – Administrative HR Assistant (Part time 60%)

ECF is looking for an Administrative HR Assistant to assist the HR department. The role involves:

  • Handling absence administration of employees, including reporting and filing necessary documents on personnel files.
  • Recruitment: posting job adverts in collaboration with the line manager; handling incoming applications; logistical organization of interviews and correspondence;
  • Insurances: Handling all administration and updates of leavers/joiners for all ECF locations.
  • Personnel files: to make sure all electronic personnel files are complete with required documents and up to date.
  • Contract Management: Creation of new employment contracts and collecting all necessary documents.
  • Training sessions: communication dates, tracking attendees, organizing logistics
  • Contact sheet: send monthly updated contact sheet and publish on CWKX (intranet)
  • Maintaining and updating HR files and documents
  • Evaluation process: collecting and chasing evaluation documents
  • Audit: forwarding requested information to Finance for annual and mid annual audit.
  • Communication with IT and Office Managers on new joiners/leavers
  • Management temporary employment contracts

Required:

  • At least one to two years of professional experience in HR administration;
  • Strong administrative skills, excellent attention to detail;
  • Ability to work discrete with confidential information;
  • Ability to work well in a team but also to work independently;
  • Solid computer experience with emphasis in Microsoft Office, especially Excel and Word. Experience with Mac an asset;
  • Languages: Fluently English, French and/or Dutch.

The Administrative HR Assistant will be reporting to the Head of HR

Location:                     Brussels, Belgium

Start date:                   As soon as practicable

Compensation:         Competitive

To apply:   Please send your CV and cover letter in English to employment@europeanclimate.org. Please indicate ´Recruitment – Administrative HR Assistant´ in the Subject line. Telephone calls will not be forwarded to the recruitment team. All candidates will however receive a written reply.

Application deadline: 14 September 2014

For more information on the ECF, please visit www.europeanclimate.org

Europe’s low-carbon transition: understanding the chemicals sector

Europe’s low-carbon transition: understanding the chemicals sector

March 2014 - Is there a way for Europe to increase its competitiveness, while at the same time reducing its greenhouse gas emissions?  This is the key question that the European Climate Foundation asks in a study looking at the relationship between emissions reductions and competitiveness, using the European chemicals industry as a case study.

The ECF authored the report with analytical support from McKinsey & Company and in consultation with a group of industry representatives and academics. It highlights the need for a broader notion of competitiveness to enable Europe to profit from the challenges of the transition. As a major share of emissions reduction opportunities identified in the study lie in cross-company and cross-sector integration, the question is raised as to how industry and policy makers can interact effectively to unlock these more complex opportunities.

The report can be downloaded here.

The annexes can be downloaded here.

The launch presentation can be downloaded here.

Europe’s Failure to Quit Coal

Europe’s Failure to Quit Coal

Sandbag’s report reveals that high emission levels from coal in the power sector could be here to stay unless policies change. Coal emissions in the power sector have risen 6% since 2010, even as power demand falls and renewables massively grow. Coal for power now represents 18% of total EU CO2 emissions, equivalent to all road transport. Growth in renewables has almost entirely displaced gas generation. If coal generation had been displaced, EU power emissions could have fallen by 18% instead of 7%, since 2010. The report explores the question of how long high coal use in the EU could continue and concludes that unless there are changes in the EU’s energy and climate policies it could remain stubbornly high into the next decade.

Download the report here.

Europe’s Dirty 30

Europe’s Dirty 30

CO2 emissions from Europe’s coal power plants are undermining climate efforts, reveals the “Europe’s Dirty 30″ report, released by CAN Europe, WWF, European Environmental Bureau, Health and Environment Alliance (HEAL) and Climate Alliance Germany. The report exposes the top 30 CO2-emitting power plants in the EU in 2013, with Poland, Germany and the UK ranking first.

Despite the rapid increase of renewables and the overall decrease of total EU greenhouse gas emissions, CO2 emissions from coal power stations have recently risen. Many of the EU’s coal-fired plants are now running at or near full capacity, due to a combination of economic factors, including the relatively low price of coal compared to gas and the low CO2 price caused by weak EU climate policy.

These developments put the EU in grave danger of not phasing out emissions from coal quickly enough, hence undermining the EU’s climate ambitions. The report sets out policies needed to tackle the pollution and states that the rapid phase-out of CO2 emissions from coal has to become a priority.

The report is available here.

Climate Change: Implications for Transport

Climate Change: Implications for Transport

A new briefing published by BSR, the Cambridge Institute for Sustainability Leadership (CISL) and the Cambridge Judge Business School (CJBS) distils the key findings from the recently released Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Fifth Assessment Report for the transport sector.

Key findings of the briefing include:

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    • Physical impacts of climate change on primary industries are likely to include damage to infrastructure and industrial capital assets, and could reduce availability of renewable natural resources including water.
    • Total greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from industry almost doubled between 1970 and 2010.
    • Most sector scenarios project that global demand for industrial products will increase by 45–60% by 2050 relative to 2010 production levels. Rising demand for products used to reduce GHG emissions and to adapt to climate impacts could, perversely, create pressures to increase industrial emissions.
    • An absolute reduction in GHG emissions by primary industry will require implementation of a broad range of mitigation strategies. Opportunities for mitigation include both production-related strategies, geared towards improving industrial process efficiencies, and demand-related strategies focused on reducing the overall use of product material.

Transport IG WEBThe industries summary is one of a series of thirteen, based upon The Fifth Assessment Report (AR5) of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC).

AR5 represents the most comprehensive overview of climate science to date and is the fact base that will utilised by governments and businesses to formulate climate policy in the coming years. The set of summaries cover the broad implications of climate change, how the IPCCC works and give an overview of the physical science, as well as adaptation and mitigation options. The summaries, in addition to the transport sector, cover the tourism sector, the transport sector, the agriculture industry, defence, the energy sector, extractive and primary industries, fisheries and aquaculture, the building sector, investors and financial institutions, cities and employment.

This publication has been developed and released by BSR, CISL, CJBS and ECF.

For more information and to download the report, please visit the CISL webpage.

Dirty Deals – Trade Talks Undermine EU Climate Policies

Dirty Deals – Trade Talks Undermine EU Climate Policies

Screen Shot 2014 07 24 at 11.04.32Since its inception in 2009, the Fuel Quality Directive (FQD), a European Union regulation aimed at reducing the climate impact of transport fuels, has been attacked by powerful lobby interests that do not want the EU to take action to curtail the use of particularly greenhouse gas intensive fossil fuels. While the FQD aims to reduce the climate impact of fossil fuels by addressing all sources of high carbon oil (for example oil shale, coal-to-liquid or tar sands), the oil industry has waged an extensive lobby campaign to portray the FQD as unfairly discriminating against one specific oil source: tar sands.

Recently the pressure on the EU to weaken the Fuel Quality Directive has increased notably, with oil industry groups taking the lead on lobbying efforts. And oil companies and refiners have found a new lobby vehicle to attack the FQD: the ongoing negotiations for the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP). The report argues that a truly ambitious transatlantic partnership would promote the transition towards clean renewable energy sources and the phasing-out of dangerous and carbon-intensive fossil fuels. However, it appears that for the TTIP the opposite holds true and it is more likely to undermine current climate-friendly initiatives and deter necessary actions to address the climate crisis.

Download the report here.

Green Growth: Lessons from Country Experiences

Green Growth: Lessons from Country Experiences

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Featuring 60 case studies from developing and developed countries, and reviewing governments’ and others’ experiences, the ‘Green Growth in Practice: Lessons from Country Experiences’ report is the first comprehensive global assessment of lessons and good practices in green growth planning.

Supported by Climate & Development Knowledge Network, the European Climate Foundation and the Global Green Growth Institute and focusing on nine key areas of green growth, this new report provides a wealth of information on effective approaches for harnessing the power of resource efficiency and climate compatible development for advancing economic, social and environmental goals.

For more information on the Green Growth Best Practice project, please visit http://ggbp.org

Climate Change: Implications for Extractive and Primary Industries

Climate Change: Implications for Extractive and Primary Industries

A new briefing published by BSR, the Cambridge Institute for Sustainability Leadership (CISL) and the Cambridge Judge Business School (CJBS) distils the key findings from the recently released Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Fifth Assessment Report for extractive and primary industries.

The briefing concludes that:

Industry_IG

  • Physical impacts of climate change on primary industries are likely to include damage to infrastructure and industrial capital assets, and could reduce availability of renewable natural resources including water.
  • Total greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from industry almost doubled between 1970 and 2010.
  • Most sector scenarios project that global demand for industrial products will increase by 45–60% by 2050 relative to 2010 production levels. Rising demand for products used to reduce GHG emissions and to adapt to climate impacts could, perversely, create pressures to increase industrial emissions.
  • An absolute reduction in GHG emissions by primary industry will require implementation of a broad range of mitigation strategies. Opportunities for mitigation include both production-related strategies, geared towards improving industrial process efficiencies, and demand-related strategies focused on reducing the overall use of product material.

Extractive Industries CoverThe industries summary is one of a series of thirteen, based upon The Fifth Assessment Report (AR5) of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC).

AR5 represents the most comprehensive overview of climate science to date and is the fact base that will utilised by governments and businesses to formulate climate policy in the coming years. The set of summaries cover the broad implications of climate change, how the IPCCC works and give an overview of the physical science, as well as adaptation and mitigation options. The summaries, in addition to extractive and primary industries, cover the tourism sector, the transport sector, the agriculture industry, defence, the energy sector, fisheries and aquaculture, the building sector, investors and financial institutions, cities and employment.

This publication has been developed and released by BSR, CISL, CJBS and ECF.

For more information and to download the report, please visit the CISL webpage.